Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation by Gail Lumet Buckley

Page Updated: May 12, 2017
Book Views: 183

Author
Gail Lumet Buckley
Publisher
Pebble Hill Books
Date of release
Pages
264
ISBN
9780817355937
Binding
Paperback
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
37

Advertising

Get eBOOK
Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation

Find and Download Book

Click one of share button to proceed download:
Choose server for download:
Download
Get It!
File size:8 mb
Estimated time:1 min
If not downloading or you getting an error:
  • Try another server.
  • Try to reload page — press F5 on keyboard.
  • Clear browser cache.
  • Clear browser cookies.
  • Try other browser.
  • If you still getting an error — please contact us and we will fix this error ASAP.
Sorry for inconvenience!
For authors or copyright holders
Amazon Affiliate

Go to Removal form

Leave a comment

Book review


 

This collection consists of essays written by prominent African American literature, jazz, and Albert Murray scholars, reminiscences from Murray protégés and associates, and interviews with Murray himself. It illustrates Murray’s place as a central figure in African American arts and letters and as an American cultural pioneer.

 

Born in Nokomis, Alabama, and raised in Mobile, Albert Murray graduated from TuskegeeUniversity, where he later taught, but he has long resided in New York City. He is the author of many critically acclaimed novels, memoirs, and essay collections, among them The Omni-Americans, South to a Very Old Place, Train Whistle Guitar, The Spyglass Tree, and The Seven League Boots. He is also a critic and visual artist, as well as a lifelong friend of and collaborator with artistic luminaries such as Ralph Ellison, Duke Ellington, and Romare Bearden. As such, his life and work are testaments to the centrality of southern and African American aesthetics in American art. Murray is widely viewed as a figure who, through his art and criticism, transforms the “fakelore” of white culture into a new folklore that illustrates the centrality of the blues and jazz idioms and reveals the black vernacular as what is most distinct about American art.


Readers reviews